L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567

L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567

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Title: L. Iulii Flori De gestis Romanorum, historiarum lib. IIII. Et seorsum in eos commentarius Ioannis StadI, 1567
Author: Lucius Annaeus Florus
Publisher: Antverpiæ, ex officina Christophori Plantini
Condition: Good

An extremely scarce Plantin Press and first print edition of Florus’s Epitome of Roman History, being a brief sketch of the history of Rome from the foundation of the nation to the closing of the temple of Janus by Emperor Augustus. The works themselves are derived mainly from the writings of Roman historian Titus Livius, and his Ab Urbe Condita.

While Florus received criticism in his work due to several chronological and geographical inaccuracies, the Epitome of Roman History was nevertheless vastly popular during the late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, as well as being referenced in schools up to the 19th century.

Of Florus himself, the writer has been variously named as Julius Florus, Lucius Anneus Florus, or simply Annaeus Florus. Based on similarities of style, it was deduced that he was Publius Annius Florus, poet, rhetorician, and friend of Emperor Hadrian.

This edition is lacking the commentaries by Stadius

Worldcat records only 9 existing copies of this edition in libraries.

One finely bound volume in 12mo, 149+(3) pages

On note of condition, this volume is in good shape, with minor wear and rubbing to the boards. There is foxing and dampstaining throughout.